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Robert Kingsley is a former Lifewire writer who specializes in technology. He has worked as an IT support engineer, installing, configuring, and maintaining Windows computers. Tweet Share Email. What We Like. What We Don’t Like. Download ViStart. Download Start Menu 8. Download Start Menu Reviver. Download Classic Shell. Download Pokki.

Was this page helpful? Thanks for letting us know! Tell us why! More from Lifewire. Newsletter Sign Up. This feature appeared first in Start Menu X and is our invention.

This list contains frequently used applications, e. Thanks to a smart algorithm, we’ve been able to make it so the applications you use the most are always at your fingertips. This list combines both standard applications and Windows 8 apps. Unfortunately, in Windows 10, links to folders were removed from the system menu. You are only given a list of applications, so even getting to the control panel from the menu has become very difficult.

It’s a good thing you have Start Menu 10! With our program you can configure a customized list of folders. A broad selection of 25 system folders and the ability to add your own folders or applications are what you need to tailor the menu to your individual needs. The Windows 10 system menu and other applications that thoughtlessly copied the Windows 7 menu force you to use a small window to select applications.

Consequently, you have to constantly scroll through this list and make lots of superfluous mouse movements. We have fixed this annoyance in the interface. Folder contents make use of the entire screen and selecting an application only depends on how fast your eyes are. In an effort to make life simpler, Microsoft has hidden the Hibernate command in Windows To get there, press to put your cursor in the search box, and type power but.

From now on, the Hibernate option appears in the menu shown in Figure , just like it did in the good old days. Choose Power to see them. As shown in Figure , shutting down is only one of the options for finishing your work session. What follows are your others. Sleep is great. When the flight attendant hands over your pretzels and cranberry cocktail, you can take a break without closing all your programs or shutting down the computer.

Shutting down your computer requires only two steps now, rather than as in Windows 8. The instant you put the computer to sleep, Windows quietly transfers a copy of everything in memory into an invisible file on the hard drive.

But it still keeps everything alive in memory—the battery provides a tiny trickle of power—for when you return and want to dive back into work.

If you do return soon, the next startup is lightning-fast. Fortunately, Windows still has the hard drive copy of your work environment. So now when you tap a key to wake the computer, you may have to wait 30 seconds or so—not as fast as 2 seconds, but certainly better than the 5 minutes it would take to start up, reopen all your programs, reposition your document windows, and so on.

You can send a laptop to sleep just by closing the lid. This command quits all open programs and then quits and restarts Windows again automatically. Sleep is almost always better all the way around. The only exceptions have to do with hardware installation. Anytime you have to open up the PC to make a change installing memory, hard drives, or sound or video cards , you should shut the thing down first.

Press Enter, and arrow-key your way to Shut down. Press Enter again. But there are even faster ways. If you have a laptop, just close the lid. If you have a desktop PC, press its power button. In each of these cases, though—menu, lid, switch, or button— you can decide whether the computer shuts down, goes to sleep, hibernates, or just ignores you.

If your computer has a physical keyboard—you old-timer, you! For example, press to enter the left-side column from the bottom. Or press and then to enter the right side.

You can no longer type the first initial of something to select it. This thing is awesome. The search box used to be part of the Start menu. You know? This search can find files, folders, programs, email messages, address book entries, calendar appointments, pictures, movies, PDF documents, music files, web bookmarks, and Microsoft Office documents, among other things. It also finds anything in the Start menu, making it a very quick way to pull up something without having to click through a bunch of submenus.

You can read the meaty details about search in Chapter 3. Jump lists are submenus that list frequently used commands and files in each of your programs for quick access. In other words, jump lists can save you time when you want to resume work on something you had open recently.

They save you burrowing through folders. Figure shows the technique. Jump lists display the most recently opened documents in each program. To see it, r ight-click the button, or on a touchscreen hold your finger down on it. This secret little menu of options appears when you right-click the button. There, in all its majesty, is the secret Start menu.

All the items in it are described elsewhere in this book, but some are especially useful to have at your mousetip:. System opens a window that provides every possible detail about your machine. Control Panel is the quickest known method to get to the desktop Control Panel, described in Chapter 7. Task Manager. This special screen Exiting Programs is your lifeline when a program seems to be locked up.

Thanks to the Task Manager, you can quit that app and get on with your life. The Lock screen provides a glimpse of useful information, like the time and your battery charge. And you can change the photo that appears as the Lockscreen wallpaper. In the Background pop-up menu, you have two choices. You can plaster your Lock screen with a Picture a choice of handsome professional nature shots provided by Microsoft; you can also click Browse to search your computer for a photo of your own or Slideshow.

Slideshow turns your Lock screen into a digital photo frame, cycling through a selection of photos. It uses your Pictures folder for source material, or you can click Browse to choose a different folder. Only use pictures that fit my screen. Play a slideshow when using battery power. A slideshow uses more battery power than a not-slideshow. Leave this off for best battery life. This option appears only if your computer can run on battery power.

When my PC is inactive, show lock screen instead of turning off the screen. This option makes the slideshow end after 30 minutes, an hour, or 3 hours, at which point the screen finally goes dark. Each photo appears, slowly zooming in for added coolness. Every now and then, Windows shakes things up by combining a few photos into a tiled mosaic.

Click one to choose from a list of Lock screen—compatible programs. But the app you choose to show detailed status gets four lines of text, right next to the big clock on the Lock screen. Skip to main content. Start your free trial. Chapter 1. The Lock Screen. Mouse : Click anywhere. Or turn the mouse wheel. Keyboard : Press any key. Tip You can change the photo background of the Lock screen, make it a slideshow, or fiddle with which information appears here; see Customizing the Lock Screen.

The Login Screen. Swipe your finger across the fingerprint reader, if your computer has one. Put your eye up to the iris reader, if your machine is so equipped. Type a traditional password. Skip the security altogether. Jump directly to the desktop when you turn on the machine. The Desktop. Meet the Start Menu. Start Menu: The Left Side. Tip Some keystrokes from previous Windows versions are still around.

Most Used. Recently Added. Important Places. All Apps. Tip Submenus, also known as cascading menus, largely have been eliminated from the Start menu. How to Customize the Left Side. Tip How cool is this? Start Menu: The Right Side. Tip Not all Start menu tiles display their own names. How to Customize the Right Side. Make the right side bigger or smaller. Make the right side fill the screen. Move a tile. Resize a tile. Add new tiles. Tip In the Edge browser, you can also add a web page to the right side.

Make a tile stop blinking. Remove a tile. Group your tiles. Click or tap just above your newly grouped tiles. Type a name for this group, and then press Enter. Your group name is now immortalized. Eliminate all tiles. Change the color. Turn off ads. Shutting Down.

You can bring it back, though. In the search results, click Power Options.

 
 

 

1. Desktop & Start Menu – Windows The Missing Manual [Book]

 
The new version of Windows forces you to use apps , which take up a huge part of the menu. Tip In the Edge browser, you can also add a web page to the right side. Split the contents of any folder into virtual groups without changing the location of files on disk. This is your colonist. Slideshow turns your Lock screen into a digital photo frame, cycling through a selection of photos.

 
 

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